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Classics Courses (CLSX)

CLSX 148 Greek and Roman Mythology (3). A Systematic examination of the traditional cycles of Greek myth and their survival and metamorphosis in Latin literature. Some attention is given to the problems of comparative mythology and the related areas of archaeology and history. Slides and other illustrated materials. No knowledge of Latin or Greek required.  For the honors version, please see CLSX 149.

CLSX 149 Greek and Roman Mythology, Honors (3). The study of Greek and Roman mythology through extensive readings in primary classical texts and secondary authors. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor.  For the non-honors version, please see CLSX 148.

CLSX 151 Introduction to Classical Archaeology (3). An introduction to the history, methods, and excavation techniques of archaeology, with special emphasis on ancient Greece and Rome. Topics include stratigraphy, chronology, artifact analysis, the role of archaeology in our understanding of Greek and Roman society, and the treatment of archaeology in popular culture. Illustrated throughout with presentations of important archaeological sites of the ancient Mediterranean such as Athens and Pompeii, from the earliest times through late antiquity.  For the honors version, please see CLSX 351.

CLSX 177 First Year Seminar: ______ (3). A limited-enrollment, seminar course for first-time freshmen, addressing current issues in Classics. Course is designed to meet the critical thinking learning outcome of the KU Core. First-Year Seminar topics are coordinated and approved by the Office of First-Year Experience. Prerequisite: First-time freshman status. 

CLSX 210 Greek Rhetoric in Theory and Practice (3). An exploration of the theory and practice of ancient Greek rhetoric, with the aim of developing student's own rhetorical skills and habits. All readings are in translation; no knowledge of ancient Greek is required. Students study rhetoric in such authors as Homer, Demosthenes, Plato, and Lysias and discuss such topics as the role of public speaking in maintaining Greek democracy, the difference between rhetorical skills as a means and an end, the relationship between rhetorical style and civic identity, and the adaptability of rhetoric to various circumstances and audiences. Students practice delivery with ancient speeches; write and deliver speeches tailored to a variety of situations; and listen to and critique the speeches of their peers and others.

CLSX 230 Greek Literature and Civilization (3). An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be writers of poetry and prose such as Homer, Sappho, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, athletics, oral performance, sexuality, and the development of literary genres. No knowledge of Greek required and no prerequisite.  For the honors version, please see CLSX 330.

CLSX 232 Word Power: Greek and Latin Elements in English (3). A study of English words drawn from Greek and Latin for all those interested in the sources of the English vocabulary. Enough Greek and Latin for essential purposes is also studied. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 andCLSX 332

CLSX 240 Roman Literature and Civilization (3). An introduction to ancient Roman literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be authors such as Plautus, Vergil, Livy, Petronius, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, oratory, slavery, political propaganda, the Roman games, and the development of Roman literature. No knowledge of Latin required and no prerequisite.  For the honors version, please see CLSX 340.

CLSX 332 Scientific Word Power: Greek and Latin Elements in the Vocabulary of Science (3). A study of the terminology of science with reference to its debt to the Greek and Latin languages. While all the natural sciences will be treated, there will be some emphasis on the biological sciences. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332

CLSX 330 Greek Literature and Civilization, Honors (3). Honors version of CLSX 230. An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Greek texts. No knowledge of Greek required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor.

CLSX 332 Scientific Word Power: Greek and Latin Elements in the Vocabulary of Science (3). A study of the terminology of science with reference to its debt to Greek and Latin languages. While all the natural sciences will be treated, there will be some emphasis on the biological sciences. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332

CLSX 340 Roman Literature and Civilization, Honors (3). Honors version of CLSX 240. An introduction to ancient Roman literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Greek texts. No knowledge of Latin required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. 

CLSX 350 Modern Themes, Ancient Models: _____ (3). The study of the evolution of a cultural or literary tradition from the Graeco-Roman world into modern times. The theme of the course will normally vary from semester to semester; topics such as these may be examined: the analysis of a literary genre (e.g. drama, satire, lyric), the transformation of the ancient mythical heritage, the reception of ancient astronomy. Previous courses have included Tao, Logos, and the Cosmos and Modern Tragedies. Students should consult the Timetable for the theme of the course in a given semester. With departmental permission, may be repeated for credit as topic varies. 

CLSX 351 Introduction to Classical Archaeology, Honors (3). Honors version of CLSX 151, with the focus towards critical approaches and research. Special attention is paid to recent methodological, theoretical, and ethical debates within the profession of Classical archaeology. Assignments and activities may include position papers on contentious issues of the day, research assignments, and/or field trips to museums and related institutions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor.

CLSX 375 Studies in: _____ (1-3). Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being 12 hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

CLSX 384 The Rise of Greek Tragedy (3). Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides will be read in translation. The criticism of the plays, and the role they play in Athenian (and Greek) culture of the 5th century. This course includes the Oresteia, Oedipus Tyrannus, Antigone, and Medea. 

CLSX 388 Poetry and Politics in Fifth-Century Athens (3). The later plays of Euripides and Sophocles, selected plays by the comic dramatist Aristophanes, and passages form the historian Thucydides. Criticism of the plays, and discussion of themes common to literature and history in this period. The dissolution of a high culture. CLSX 384 is not a prerequisite. No knowledge of Greek required. 

CLSX 490 Comprehensive Examination of Classical Antiquity (1). An examination covering the six areas of course work and reading for the classical antiquity major, to be taken by the student pursuing the major in the last semester of the senior year. Prerequisite: A declared major in Classical Antiquity and status as a graduating senior. 

CLSX 492 Independent Study for Classical Antiquity Majors (3). Under the supervision of an advisor in Classics, the student will do extensive reading in the area of Classics generously defined, to result in two or more papers as agreed upon between faculty and student. 

CLSX 496 Honors Essay in Classical Antiquity (3). Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Classical literature, culture, or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay adviser. 

CLSX 501 The History of the Latin Language (3). The place of Latin among the Indo-European languages and the languages of Italy, its development as a literary medium, and how it changed in pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar from its beginnings through the Medieval period. 

CLSX 502 The Development of Ancient Greece, ca. 1000-300 B.C. (3). Emphasis on the ancient sources and texts, developments in political institutions and society, the changing definitions of personal, cultural, and national identities, and the cultural tensions between Greece and the cultures to the west and east, especially Italy and Persia. No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. (Same as HIST 502). 

CLSX 515 Gender & Sexuality in Greek Culture (3). This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Greek antiquity. Contents vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 516.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. 

CLSX 516 Gender & Sexuality in Roman Culture (3). This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Roman antiquity. Contents vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 516.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. 

CLSX 525 Aegean Archaeology and Art. (3). A cross-cultural survey of the major cultures of the prehistoric Aegean (Greek) world from the Palaeolithic period (ca. 70,000 B.C.E.) to the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 1100 B.C.E.), with special emphasis on the cultural and artistic achievements of the Minoans, Mycenaeans, and Cycladic islanders, including their contacts with the neighboring cultures of Anatolia (Hittites and Troy), the Levant, Egypt, and South Italy. Slide lectures and discussion. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Crosslisted with Art History and with Humanities and Western Civilization. 

CLSX 526 Greek Archaeology and Art (3). An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of the ancient Greek world from the Protogeometric period to the end of the Hellenistic age (ca. 100-30 B.C.), with emphasis on the major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social expression (architecture, sculpture, vase painting, and other arts). Slide lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Collection of Antiquities. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Crosslisted with Art History and with Humanities and Western Civilization. 

CLSX 527 Roman Archaeology and Art (3). An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of ancient Rome from its origins to the late empire (8th cent. B.C.E. - 4th cent. C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression (architecture, sculpture, painting), as well as on Etruscan and Greek influence on Rome and Rome's influence on its provinces. Slide lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Collection of Antiquities. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Crosslisted with Art History and with Humanities and Western Civilization. 

CLSX 529 Archaeology and Art of the Ancient Near East. (3). A cross-cultural survey of the material remains of the major civilizations of the ancient Near East, including Anatolia, Mesopotamia, the Levant, and Egypt from the Neolithic period to the rise of the Roman empire (ca. 6000 B.C.E.-30 B.C.E.). Slide lectures and discussion. Crosslisted with Art History and with Humanities and Western Civilization. 

CLSX 538 Pompeii and Herculaneum. (3). An interdisciplinary treatment of the art and archaeology of the ancient Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum in Italy. Emphasis on the structures and decorations of major public spaces and houses and on aspects of cultural, social, political, commercial, and religious life from the period of the second century B.C.E. to 79 C.E., when Pompeii and Herculaneum were buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius. Slide lectures and discussion. (Same as HA 538, HWC 538.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, History of Art, or permission of the instructor. 

CLSX 550 Capstone in Classics. (3).This capstone seminar synthesizes various aspects in the discipline of Classics by focusing on recent award-winning scholarship or creative work in the field. Specific assignments and additional readings vary from one semester to another and will be stated on the instructor's syllabus. Introductory knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Prerequisite: 15 hours in CLSX/LAT/GRK at the 200 level or above, or status as a senior major in the department, or permission of the instructor. 

CLSX 570 Study Abroad Topics in Greek and Roman Culture: _____ (3-6). This course is designed for the study of special topics in Classics at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. 

CLSX 575 Readings in: _____ (3-6). Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only six hours may count toward the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

CLSX 576 Topics in Greek and Roman Literature: _____ (3). Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, genre, or period of literature from the ancient classical world. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. 

CLSX 577 Topics in the Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean: _____(3). Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, medium, region, or period in the archaeology and art of the ancient Near Eastern and classical world. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. 

CLSX 675 Studies in: _____ (1-3). Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being 12 hours. 

CLSX 717 Investigations in Greek Drama I (3). Attendance at CLSX 384 required, plus one seminar a week, discussing the scholarly background of the major lecture, as well as the problems and aims of teaching Greek drama in English to undergraduates. No knowledge of Greek required. 

CLSX 718 Investigations in Greek Drama II (3). A continuation of CLSX 717. Attendance at CLSX 388 plus one seminar a week. No knowledge of Greek required. 

CLSX 790 Practicum in the Teaching of Classics (0.5-1). Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Classics courses. May be repeated three semester hours credit in total. 

CLSX 899 Thesis (1-6). Thesis hours.

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